Tag: Interim

Freelancing, stress and Stoicism

We freelancers are a happy lot, but that doesn’t mean it’s a stress-free lifestyle. The corollary of freedom and flexibility is inevitable uncertainty. Sometimes it feels as if you’re always stressing about either time or money. How can Stoicism help?

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The New Freelancers – @BCG

The BCG Henderson Institute has an interesting report into the gig economy; The New Freelancers: Tapping Talent in the Gig Economy.

The freelancer / sovereign professional perspective

Looking at both low-paid and high-paid freelancers in 11 countries, the report throws up some important findings, including:

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Freelancing and Brexit – @davidhowell

On Forbes.com, David Howell has some thoughts on what Brexit might mean for sovereign professionals in the post-Brexit landscape.

The key is to understand your precise needs. If you are a business, ask yourself what skills your enterprise needs today and how these could change over the next five years. Freelancers due to their flexible working practices can enable your business to tap into the skills it needs perhaps just for short periods of time. Not having the cost and time associated with hiring full-time staff, could be a way forward for your enterprise to create the dynamic workforce you need to weather the Brexit storm.

Read the full article, here.Read the full article, here.

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Uncertainty – the freelance / gig economy destiny

Are freelancers and independents preparing for the future?

You just can’t trust the future. That’s certainly been clear over the last couple of years. We seem to be contemplating the previously unthinkable, every day.

An accidental No Deal Brexit in the UK? A prolonged government shutdown in the US? Those things could be hard on a freelancer, contractor or other independents.

Traditional employment offers an illusion. Maybe that’s part of the deal: the regular pay cheque implies continuity, that the future is someone else’s concern. But, if you work for yourself, the future comes into sharper focus. Self-employment requires a more active engagement with tomorrow.

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Predictions for the freelance economy – @Forbes

Over on Forbes.com, Jeff Wald has some interesting predictions for  2019 freelance economy (in the US).

The rise of mechanisms to access and filter the freelance market is inevitable. I can definitely see large businesses deploying both Freelance Market Systems and “Alumni Labour Clouds” to manage a bench of available talent (predictions 1 and 2).

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What does a freelancer look like? Survey from @FlexJobs

FlexJobs has surveyed 1,000 (US) freelancers and found, yet again, that these are not desperate and abused individuals forced into abusive contracts by uncaring, capitalist overlords.

In fact, as TechRepublic summarises:

the average full-time freelance worker is a female Gen Xer working in the writing, marketing, editing, or creative career fields. This person works primarily for small companies and individuals, and juggles two to three jobs at a time, the report found. The average worker freelances by choice, and has been doing so for at least three years, and envisions continuing this type of career for the long-term, though they have worked at traditional companies in the past.

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Freelancer? Are you ready for the coming storm?

A recession, or at least a significant downturn, is inevitable. No-one knows when or what the cause will be, but recessions are a part of the economic cycle. Will you be ready?

It comes with the deal. If you are a sovereign professional, your sovereignty requires that you make provision for whatever fate my fling at you. That can be tough to hear if you haven’t even got the hang of saving cash for your tax bill.

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Reasons to say No to more work

Another thought-provoking list from Nicholas Bate.

When you’re a sovereign professional, or run a small business, it often feels like a crazy, reckless sin to turn down work.

Nicholas tells us why we should…

  1. Most great things (time, energy, attention) are finite. Another yes will destroy their power.
  2. And the few astonishing things (the night sky, true love, appreciation for Chopin) which are infinite, require a no to appreciate them fully.
  3. There is not a single reason why you should take on the consequences of their poor planning and ruin your evening.
  4. Babies are not small and cute for very long at all.
  5. To respect yourself.
  6. To have time to go to the gym.
  7. To-paradoxically-build your value because of the focus and quality of your work.

Read the full 22 here and mull over Christmas.

 

Photo by Enrico Carcasci on Unsplash