Time to read

Nicholas Bate offers essential advice on finding time to read:

1.Always read for 30 minutes before any Netflix viewing.

3.Read for 20 minutes before settling to sleep.

5.Take a couple of real books on the business trip. Read in line, on the transfer bus, in Starbucks, while waiting for buddies in the lobby to get the uber to the conference.

Read the full list in Basics 7: Finding More Time for Reading, here.

I’m interested that so many of the blogs I follow have also re-blogged this. Either  we have a common love of reading, or face a common challenge of insufficient time.

Photo by Alfons Morales on Unsplash

3 good reasons to curl up with a classic

I confess, I’m a latecomer to the classics of Ancient Greece and Rome. I loved the Greek (and Norse) myths as a kid, but I’d not really read any original work until maybe 10 or 15 years ago.

By pure chance, I started with Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations. There was no better place to start; relevant, accessible and blessedly short. I’m still pitifully under-read, but I’ve since enjoyed Aristotle, Homer, Seneca and Epictetus.

Suitably “born-again”, I now think everyone should read some ancient classics. But, why bother? The Art of Manliness blog has a persuasive essay, here.

To that, I would just add my own three reasons.

1. Relevance

Those books written 1,800 to 2,500 years ago can often feel strangely contemporary. The world the ancients describe, the human condition, the challenges, even the values feel familiar. Why? Because we evolve slowly. Strip away our BMWs and iPhones and not much has changed. When Aristotle tells you that the essence of storytelling is “pity, fear, catharsis”, he is still correct. As Marcus Aurelius observes,

To see the things of the present moment is to see all that is now, all that has been since time began, and all that shall be unto the world’s end; for all things are of one kind and one form. [Meditations, 6.37]

2. Perspective

Because those millenia-old texts are still relevant, they help put things in perspective. Brexit, Trump or the idiot on the end of the phone are probably not going to bring the end of days.

Equally, some things are old, and go deeper, than we think. For example, many (though not all) of the values we believe to be Christian you’ll find in Homer, eight centuries earlier.

The classics put things in perspective.

3. Distillation

Why are the classics classic? It’s not because they were ordained as such centuries ago. Each generation visits them anew and deems them worthy of passing on to the next generation. As with Aristotle or Aurelius, so with Sun Tsu, Machiavelli or Shakespeare – you have the distilled wisdom of the ages.

From all of human history, the classics bring you the best bits. It’s like a greatest hits of history.

There is, after all, a good reason why we don’t still celebrate the sitcoms of Shakespeare’s neighbour, Bert.

Where to start?

I find Meditations pithy and accessible. Another great place to start is T.E. Lawrence’s translation of Homer’s Odyssey. Lawrence (that is Lawrence of Arabia) rendered his translation in prose form, like a novel, rather than in verse which makes for an easier read. Along the way, you’ll meet the cyclops, the sirens and the witch Circe.

The Art of Manliness article has a great reading list to get started with and, as it points out, many of these are now available free online.

So, cheaper than Netflix, curl up with a classic for January.

 

A Merry Post-Christmas to me!

Bob Dylan, The Complete Album Collection Vol. One. Happy 2019!

This all started with a trip to the Mondo Scripto exhibition at the Halcyon Gallery, back in November.

I’m not a big fan of Dylan’s drawings, but the event took me back to the lyrics and the songs which, of course, are sublime. Then, I was blessed with some new stuff for Christmas (Trouble No More, from the Bootleg Series) .

And then the itch started. I remember this collection being released in 2013. In its original form, it came with a Harmonica-shaped USB stick containing all the the music for easy download. I really wanted it back then, but I resisted. It contains every studio and live album by Bob Dylan, from 1962’s eponymous debut to 2012’s Tempest (his last album, so far, of original material). That’s 41 albums in all.

It doesn’t include the Bootleg Series, of which there are now 14 albums, and the various Greatest Hits collections have been replaced with a two-disc collection, Side Tracks, that sweeps up all the otherwise unreleased tracks.

Some of these albums I’ve only had on vinyl. Others I’ve never heard (Together Through Life, Christmas In The Heart, anyone?).

At first inspection, it looks fantastic. Each disk is in a miniature card reproduction of its original sleeve. Obviously, the sleeve notes become too small to read, but they are included in a nice little hard-back book, along with the original artwork.

Perhaps, I should just start at You’re No Good and work my way through, track by track.

I may be some time.

Heart calleth unto heart

Cultural Offering has a beautiful, wintery quote from Washington Irving:

The dreariness and desolation of the landscape, the short gloomy days and darksome nights, while they circumscribe our wanderings, shut in our feelings also from rambling abroad, and make us more keenly disposed for the pleasure of the social circle. 

Read the rest, here.

Photo by Ian Keefe on Unsplash

Learn slowly … and deeply

Tanmay Vora on learning slowly… and why social media is often not the right channel.

I guess it’s the same with the media we consume. In a  bid to stay updated all the time (which is hardly what we call learning), we consume a lot of Tweets, Instagram posts, Facebook updates etc. These are quick bites that may fill your time with an illusion of learning, unless your goal is to just fill the time with something (and hide behind it).

But if you are set out to truly learn something and go deeper, then you need slow media that is cooked slowly with care, has the right ingredients and is nourishing.

Via Michael Wade’s Execupundit.

Image from Minkewink at Pixabay.

Reasons to say No to more work

Another thought-provoking list from Nicholas Bate.

When you’re a sovereign professional, or run a small business, it often feels like a crazy, reckless sin to turn down work.

Nicholas tells us why we should…

  1. Most great things (time, energy, attention) are finite. Another yes will destroy their power.
  2. And the few astonishing things (the night sky, true love, appreciation for Chopin) which are infinite, require a no to appreciate them fully.
  3. There is not a single reason why you should take on the consequences of their poor planning and ruin your evening.
  4. Babies are not small and cute for very long at all.
  5. To respect yourself.
  6. To have time to go to the gym.
  7. To-paradoxically-build your value because of the focus and quality of your work.

Read the full 22 here and mull over Christmas.

 

Photo by Enrico Carcasci on Unsplash