Echoes through time: to keep your mind within bounds

I want you not to go traipsing about from place to place, and this for two reasons. First, such frequent travel is a sign of disquiet. The mind cannot find strength in its leisure unless it stops looking around and wandering around. To keep you mind within bounds, you must first stop your body from running away. Second, it is the protracted cure that does the most good. You should rest without interruption and forget your former life. Let your eyes unlearn what they have seen; let your ears grow accustomed to more healthful words.

Seneca (4 BC – AD 65), Moral Letters to Lucilius (69.1)

Echoes through time: the primary indication of a well-ordered mind

The primary indication, to my thinking, of a well-ordered mind is a man’s ability to remain in one place and linger in his own company.

Seneca (c. 4 BC – AD 65), Moral Letters to Lucilius (Letter 2, paragraph 1)

Image: Wikipedia

“I don’t need time …”

A great quote from Duke Ellington, courtesy of The Execupundit:

I don’t need time. I need a deadline.

That’s so horribly true for me. Without a deadline time drags and tasks bloat to fill the day.

I understand Douglas Adam’s delicious quote …

I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.

…but I can never quite subscribe. Deadlines will be met, but sometimes you need a hit of adrenaline,cortisol and caffeine to get you there.

 

Image: https://www.biography.com/people/duke-ellington-9286338

Need a New Year’s resolution? Avoid 24-hour news

I’m late in flagging Michael Wade’s post on News Noise.

He makes a great point:

There is an Orwellian twist to how the press hypes certain stories and then, as interest wanes, reverses course with a “Never mind, but look at this exciting new report!”

Twitter, other social media 24-hour news channels, even the “quality” daily  newspapers are over-filled with breathless excitement and journalists interviewing other journalists. What you eagerly watched or read yesterday is obsolete today.

Better to devote your reading time to a considered viewpoint like the Economist, or other weekly. Better still:

If the subject is truly important, read a couple of books on the subject and scout out magazine and newspaper articles from all sides of the ideological spectrum.

Read the rest, here.

 

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash

Contemplation, inspiration and thanks

Happy Contemplation! It’s a week of sleeping and walking, eating and drinking, reading and pondering. Plans for the coming year will hatch, but slowly.

Goals will be set, and scratched, and set again.

Current sources of inspiration:

Established inspiration:

  • Nicholas Bate – always, always a source of pithy perspective. When I was at Microsoft, I was lucky enough to attend several of Nicholas’ courses.
  • Michael Wade – the Execupundit, I love Michael’s blend of business and military wisdom, …
  • Kurt Harden – music, life, perspective, food, politics, life

I can’t now recall which came first, but these are essential daily reading. Highly recommended. I dip into a long list of blogs and find inspiration, but these three are established, regular reading.

My thanks go to all three for their commitment and continued, high quality output.

 

Image: Winchester Cathedral

Echoes through time: seek to be worthy of appreciation

Do not worry if you have no official position. Worry about your qualifications. Do not worry because no one appreciates your abilities. Seek to be worthy of appreciation.

Confucius (551-479 BC), The Analects, Book IV, para 14

 

Image: Britannica.com© philipus/Fotolia