Echoes through time: the things that delight or trouble foolish men

Everything that happens is as normal and expected as the spring rose or the summer fruit; this is true of sickness, death, slander, intrigue, and all the other things that delight or trouble foolish men.

Marcus Aurelius (AD 120 – 180), Meditations (4.44)

Particularly pertinent for our times.

Echoes through time: a brief sojourning in an alien land

In the life of man, his time is but a moment, his being an incessant flux, his senses a dim rushlight, his body a prey of worms, his soul an unquiet eddy, his fortune dark, and his fame doubtful. In short, all that is of the body is as coursing waters, all that is of the soul as dreams and vapours; life a warfare, a brief sojourning in an alien land; and after repute, oblivion.

Marcus Aurelius (AD 120 – 180), Meditations, Book 2, verse 17

Echoes through time: enter into the mind of the speaker

“Accustom yourself to give careful attention to what others are saying, and try your best to enter into the mind of the speaker.”

Marcus Aurelius (AD 120 – 180), Meditations

 

Image: Copyright : Vladimir Korostyshevskiy at 123rf.com

Thriving in Uncertainty #stoicism

Throw off the corporate comfort blanket? Why would you?

Your cosy company role gives you pension, healthcare, (usually) decent equipment when your working and paid holidays when you’re not. And, if you’re a creative, you don’t worry about all that tawdry sales stuff. If you’re in sales, you can dodge the tedious admin.

But, we do. The ranks of the sovereign professional continue to swell.

The thinking sovereign plans and deals with all of the above. But, uncertainty is unavoidable. Being independent is enormously thrilling, but it’s scary too. All the things you never worried about – like regular money – are no longer a given.

You need strategies to cope. Happily, the Art of Manliness blog has five tools for thriving in uncertainty.

Unsurprisingly, stoicism, of simply keeping things in perspective, is top of the list.

The rest of the list is interesting, too. The common thread is frame of mind: staying agile, generating options, maintaining perspective.

It reminds me of a valuable, little book I read years ago, Who Moved My Cheese, by Spencer Johnson.

Other useful resources include:

Beyond that, you should:

  • Laugh regularly
  • Play great music daily
  • Walk outdoors, feel the rain and the wind and hear the trees

Read the full piece, here.

 

Photo by Edu Lauton on Unsplash

Something for the weekend? @dailystoic has the ultimate stoic reading list

The Daily Stoic suggests 28 must-read books on stoicism.

I’ve only read one.

My Amazon wish-list has exploded.

Ones that caught my eye include:

It might be a busy weekend.

 

Photo by Giammarco Boscaro on Unsplash

Echoes through time: the very best that can be said or done

What is the very best that can be said or done with the materials at your disposal?  Be it what it may, you have the power to say it or do it; let there be no pretence that you are not a free agent.”

Marcus Aurelius (AD 120 – 180), Meditations