John Perry Barlow – 25 Principles of Adult Behaviour

I was sad to hear of the passing of John Perry Barlow – internet pioneer, lyricist and cattle rancher – and posted this piece over on the Burning Pine blog.

I also came across this, which is better shared here. Approaching 30 and “surprised to have reached an age of indisputable adult”, Barlow wrote himself 25 principles of Adult Behaviour.

You can read the full list over on Lifehacker.

Here’s a taster:

  • Never assume the motives of others are, to them, less noble than yours are to you.
  • Expand your sense of the possible.
  • Don’t trouble yourself with matters you truly cannot change.
  • Concern yourself with what is right rather than who is right.
  • Learn the needs of those around you and respect them.
  • Avoid the pursuit of happiness. Seek to define your mission and pursue that.
  • Endure.

Worth discovering.

Also, an excuse to share the song Cassidy, mentioned in the article.

Here’s the Dead:

I have seen where the wolf has slept by the silver stream.
I can tell by the mark he left, you were in his dream.
Ah, child of countless trees.
Ah, child of boundless seas.

And also, on the subject of Cassidy(s), here’s a beautiful piece by Barlow describing the song’s origins.

Echoes through time: lay hands on today

If you lay hands on today, you will find you are less dependent on tomorrow. While you delay, life speeds on by.

Every thing we have belongs to others, Lucilius; time alone is ours. Nature has put us in possession of this one thing, this fleeting, slippery thing – and anyone who wants to can dispossess us.

Seneca (4 BC – AD 65),  Moral Letters to Lucilius (1.1)

Why we don’t have nice things – @thisisseth

We get what we deserve. So says Seth:

Every once in awhile, someone steps up and makes something better. Much better. When it happens, it’s up to us to stand up and notice it. Which means buying it and consuming it with the very same care that it was created with.

Read the rest, here.

 

Photo by Wesual Click on Unsplash

Echoes through time: the primary indication of a well-ordered mind

The primary indication, to my thinking, of a well-ordered mind is a man’s ability to remain in one place and linger in his own company.

Seneca (c. 4 BC – AD 65), Moral Letters to Lucilius (Letter 2, paragraph 1)

Image: Wikipedia