Tag: Marcus Aurelius

How to Think Like a Roman Emperor – @DonJRobertson

Stoic, cognitive psychotherapist, trainer and writer Donald Robertson has a new book out in April. If you took part in the recent Stoic Week event, you’ll recognise him and his voice from the introductory webinar and recorded exercises.

In How to Think Like a Roman Emperor: The Stoic Philosophy of Marcus Aurelius, Robertson combines historical biography, stoic philosophy and cognitive behavioural therapy. The result promises to be an effective, hands-on guide to applying stoicism in everyday life.

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3 good reasons to curl up with a classic

I confess, I’m a latecomer to the classics of Ancient Greece and Rome. I loved the Greek (and Norse) myths as a kid, but I’d not really read any original work until maybe 10 or 15 years ago.

By pure chance, I started with Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations. There was no better place to start; relevant, accessible and blessedly short. I’m still pitifully under-read, but I’ve since enjoyed Aristotle, Homer, Seneca and Epictetus.

Suitably “born-again”, I now think everyone should read some ancient classics. But, why bother? The Art of Manliness blog has a persuasive essay, here.

To that, I would just add my own three reasons.

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Echoes through time: take your stand

An empty pageant; a stage play; flocks of sheep, herds of cattle; a tussle of spearmen; a bone flung among a pack of curs; a crumb tossed into a pond of fish; ants, loaded and labouring; mice, scared and scampering; puppets, jerking on their strings – that is life. In the midst of it all you must take your stand, good-temperedly and without disdain, yet always aware that a man’s worth is no greater than the worth of his ambition.

Marcus Aurelius (AD 120 – 180), Meditations (7.3)