Tag: Downtime

3 good reasons to curl up with a classic

I confess, I’m a latecomer to the classics of Ancient Greece and Rome. I loved the Greek (and Norse) myths as a kid, but I’d not really read any original work until maybe 10 or 15 years ago.

By pure chance, I started with Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations. There was no better place to start; relevant, accessible and blessedly short. I’m still pitifully under-read, but I’ve since enjoyed Aristotle, Homer, Seneca and Epictetus.

Suitably “born-again”, I now think everyone should read some ancient classics. But, why bother? The Art of Manliness blog has a persuasive essay, here.

To that, I would just add my own three reasons.

Continue reading “3 good reasons to curl up with a classic”

Learn slowly … and deeply

Tanmay Vora on learning slowly… and why social media is often not the right channel.

I guess it’s the same with the media we consume. In a  bid to stay updated all the time (which is hardly what we call learning), we consume a lot of Tweets, Instagram posts, Facebook updates etc. These are quick bites that may fill your time with an illusion of learning, unless your goal is to just fill the time with something (and hide behind it).

But if you are set out to truly learn something and go deeper, then you need slow media that is cooked slowly with care, has the right ingredients and is nourishing.

Via Michael Wade’s Execupundit.

Image from Minkewink at Pixabay.

Reasons to say No to more work

Another thought-provoking list from Nicholas Bate.

When you’re a sovereign professional, or run a small business, it often feels like a crazy, reckless sin to turn down work.

Nicholas tells us why we should…

  1. Most great things (time, energy, attention) are finite. Another yes will destroy their power.
  2. And the few astonishing things (the night sky, true love, appreciation for Chopin) which are infinite, require a no to appreciate them fully.
  3. There is not a single reason why you should take on the consequences of their poor planning and ruin your evening.
  4. Babies are not small and cute for very long at all.
  5. To respect yourself.
  6. To have time to go to the gym.
  7. To-paradoxically-build your value because of the focus and quality of your work.

Read the full 22 here and mull over Christmas.

 

Photo by Enrico Carcasci on Unsplash

Happy Thanksgiving!

… to all my American friends.

It seems a career in technology brings you many friends in or from the US, as does following some great blogs on shared interests. Those are good things.

Thanksgiving is a wonderful tradition (less so the now universal Black Friday that follows). In the UK, we tend to bundle the giving of thanks into tinsel-decked week of Christmas and New Year … if we remember at all.

Our turkeys live a month longer, but we don’t really understand pumpkins.

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Photo by Ricardo Gomez Angel on Unsplash

The sovereignty of the Ouija board

We sovereign professionals are a strong-willed lot, always completely in control and aware of the forces acting on us. So, I love this psychology study on Ouija users.

Psychologists at Aarhus University tracked the eye movements of users in the normal, involuntary, spirit-driven state and when using the planchette (pointer) to deliberately spell out words in a “voluntary” state.

Spoiler alert!

The experimenters found that:

when looking to see whether at least one participant in a pair made a predictive eye movement, the rates of prediction were just as high as for individuals in the voluntary condition (i.e. for any given move of the planchette, at least one person usually knew where it was going); second, rates of prediction increased in the Ouija board condition, but not the voluntary condition, presumably as the participants became increasingly aware of the diminishing number of meaningful options available.

Read the full spookiness, here.

 

Photo by dragonoak on Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND

Evolution of the Grey Fox

The Grey Fox talks openly and honestly about his evolving blog: seven years old and with a slightly broader remit of “ageing with style”:

Style is not just how you look and what you wear: it’s how you live – where you go on holiday, what car you drive, the watch you wear, what food and drink you like, what you do in your spare time, how you treat others, what books you read.

Always worth a read.