Tag: Inspiration

Stoicism events?

Donald Robertson, author of How to Think Like a Roman Emperor (and many other books), posts a list of forthcoming Stoicism events.

The first is the Marcus Aurelius Anniversary conference, in honour of Marcus’ 1,900th birthday.

The events are virtual, which removes another excuse for not attending. I also see that recording will be available later for donating attendees.

More information, here.

Personal compass, rebooted by Nicholas Bate

A salient reminder of where to focus…

  1. Your career. What are you doing this week to make it sustainable, enjoyable and still viable in 2 years from now?
  2. Your wellness. How much are you simply moving? What’s the quality of your nutrition? Sleeping sufficient? Taking some time out?

Read the rest, here.

Then, possibly, read Nicholas’ debut novel, Meet Molly. More here.

Photo by Anastasia Petrova on Unsplash

Echoes through time: even self-restraint can comb its hair

The rough clothes, the rank growth of hair and beard, the sworn hatred of silverware, the pallet laid on the ground: all these and any other perverse form of self-aggrandisement are things you should avoid…

The life we endeavour to live should be better than the general practice, not contrary to it…

Philosophy demands self-restraint, not self-abnegation – and even self-restraint can comb its hair.

Seneca (4 BC – AD 65),  Moral Letters to Lucilius (5.2 – 5.5)

Worth a re-post in these locked down times.

Take time to think big – @DanielPink

Harried by the relentless, depthless demands of email, social media, Zoom, phone and Slack?

Here’s a great idea from author Daniel Pink, originating with statesman George Schultz – the Schultz Hour.

Pinkcast 4.07. This is how to carve out an hour a week to think big. | Daniel H. Pink

Image: Claudine Gossett Photography (via UChicago News)

Matt Ridley and Jordan Peterson

This was my weekend watch. It’s a fantastic, far-reaching discussion across the evolution of virtue, morality, free trade and more. It touches on the green revolution and on Ridley’s Rational Optimist perspective (similar to Steven Pinker’s Enlightenment Now.

In fact, it’s all that you might expect from a discussion between Peterson and Ridley.

Well worth a watch.