What does a freelancer look like? Survey from @FlexJobs

FlexJobs has surveyed 1,000 (US) freelancers and found, yet again, that these are not desperate and abused individuals forced into abusive contracts by uncaring, capitalist overlords.

In fact, as TechRepublic summarises:

the average full-time freelance worker is a female Gen Xer working in the writing, marketing, editing, or creative career fields. This person works primarily for small companies and individuals, and juggles two to three jobs at a time, the report found. The average worker freelances by choice, and has been doing so for at least three years, and envisions continuing this type of career for the long-term, though they have worked at traditional companies in the past.

Among the more interesting findings:

  • 92% of freelancers said the freelance lifestyle is either extremely (55%) or somewhat (37%) important to them
  • 70% said that work-life balance was a top factor in deciding to freelance, followed by “Desire to chose when I work” (62%) and freedom (56%)
  • 84% said the biggest benefit was a flexible schedule
  • 65% held either bachelor’s or graduate degrees
  • The most popular ways of finding new clients (the biggest challenge cited by 69%) were through networking (63%) and job sites (47%)

As regards quality of life:

  • 63% said freelancing had a “positive impact.”
  • 60% said freelancing has helped them become healthier
  • 66% said they are less stressed as a freelancer.

Interestingly though, “asked if freelancing is their primary source of income, 43% said yes, while 58% said no”. That chimes with a recent report from  JP Morgan Chase (The Online Platform Economy in 2018) that found most participants in the online platform economy are active for just a few months in the year. My own view of the Chase report though, is that both the nature of the research and of the use of platforms skews the finding towards part-time rather than full-time freelancers.

Interesting reading though.

The TechRepublic article is here.

FlexJob’s press release is here.

And, the main FlexJob’s report is here.

 

Photo by Jane Palash on Unsplash

Freelancer? Are you ready for the coming storm?

A recession, or at least a significant downturn, is inevitable. No-one knows when or what the cause will be, but recessions are a part of the economic cycle. Will you be ready?

It comes with the deal. If you are a sovereign professional, your sovereignty requires that you make provision for whatever fate my fling at you. That can be tough to hear if you haven’t even got the hang of saving cash for your tax bill.

Here’s a great article from Forbes, by Jon Younger: Freelancers, Get Ready For The Coming Recession.

Have a read. It’s not all about money. It’s about being ready.

 

Photo by Pop & Zebra on Unsplash

 

Learn slowly … and deeply

Tanmay Vora on learning slowly… and why social media is often not the right channel.

I guess it’s the same with the media we consume. In a  bid to stay updated all the time (which is hardly what we call learning), we consume a lot of Tweets, Instagram posts, Facebook updates etc. These are quick bites that may fill your time with an illusion of learning, unless your goal is to just fill the time with something (and hide behind it).

But if you are set out to truly learn something and go deeper, then you need slow media that is cooked slowly with care, has the right ingredients and is nourishing.

Via Michael Wade’s Execupundit.

Image from Minkewink at Pixabay.

Tax-man rapped for aggressive approach to freelancers

Levies for allegedly unpaid taxes, no supporting calculations and no right of appeal. The House of Lords finds that HMRC has been acting aggressively and disproportionately to freelancers it suspects of having avoided tax.

From David Byers in The Times:

The economic affairs committee in the House of Lords this week said that HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) was overusing “disproportionate” powers that allow it to demand swift payments of unpaid tax from those it suspects of tax avoidance. Those suspected have no right to appeal to a tribunal.

Members said that accelerated payment notices (APNs) and follower notices were being aimed unfairly at lower and middle-income freelancers such as IT workers and NHS nurses, rather than the promoters of tax avoidance schemes.

Lord Forsyth of Drumlean, chairman of the committee, said the balance of power had “tipped too far in favour of HMRC and against the fundamental protections every taxpayer should expect”.

Two pieces in The Times, here and here.

The report from the House of Lords committee, here.

 

Image via Pixabay.

Reasons to say No to more work

Another thought-provoking list from Nicholas Bate.

When you’re a sovereign professional, or run a small business, it often feels like a crazy, reckless sin to turn down work.

Nicholas tells us why we should…

  1. Most great things (time, energy, attention) are finite. Another yes will destroy their power.
  2. And the few astonishing things (the night sky, true love, appreciation for Chopin) which are infinite, require a no to appreciate them fully.
  3. There is not a single reason why you should take on the consequences of their poor planning and ruin your evening.
  4. Babies are not small and cute for very long at all.
  5. To respect yourself.
  6. To have time to go to the gym.
  7. To-paradoxically-build your value because of the focus and quality of your work.

Read the full 22 here and mull over Christmas.

 

Photo by Enrico Carcasci on Unsplash