Category: Downtime

Time to read

Nicholas Bate offers essential advice on finding time to read:

1.Always read for 30 minutes before any Netflix viewing.

3.Read for 20 minutes before settling to sleep.

5.Take a couple of real books on the business trip. Read in line, on the transfer bus, in Starbucks, while waiting for buddies in the lobby to get the uber to the conference.

Read the full list in Basics 7: Finding More Time for Reading, here.

I’m interested that so many of the blogs I follow have also re-blogged this. Either  we have a common love of reading, or face a common challenge of insufficient time.

Photo by Alfons Morales on Unsplash

3 good reasons to curl up with a classic

I confess, I’m a latecomer to the classics of Ancient Greece and Rome. I loved the Greek (and Norse) myths as a kid, but I’d not really read any original work until maybe 10 or 15 years ago.

By pure chance, I started with Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations. There was no better place to start; relevant, accessible and blessedly short. I’m still pitifully under-read, but I’ve since enjoyed Aristotle, Homer, Seneca and Epictetus.

Suitably “born-again”, I now think everyone should read some ancient classics. But, why bother? The Art of Manliness blog has a persuasive essay, here.

To that, I would just add my own three reasons.

Continue reading “3 good reasons to curl up with a classic”

Happy Thanksgiving!

… to all my American friends.

It seems a career in technology brings you many friends in or from the US, as does following some great blogs on shared interests. Those are good things.

Thanksgiving is a wonderful tradition (less so the now universal Black Friday that follows). In the UK, we tend to bundle the giving of thanks into tinsel-decked week of Christmas and New Year … if we remember at all.

Our turkeys live a month longer, but we don’t really understand pumpkins.

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Photo by Ricardo Gomez Angel on Unsplash

Poetry: The Icelandic Language

The Hammock Papers shares an evocative poem from Bill Holm, The Icelandic Language:

In this language, no industrial revolution;
no pasteurized milk; no oxygen, no telephone;
only sheep, fish, horses, water falling.
The middle class can hardly speak it.

In this language, no flush toilet; you stumble
through dark and rain with a handful of rags.
The door groans; the old smell comes
up from under the earth to meet you.

Read the rest, here.

More on Holm, here and here.

This poem, apparently, comes from a collection, The Dead Get By With Everything.

 

Photo by Ghost Presenter on Unsplash

The coddling of the American mind – Economist

The Economist has a review of a new book: The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure. By Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt.

It looks fascinating though, sadly, my Must Read shelf is currently creaking at its limit.

Yet, in a week when Manchester University Student Union bans clapping and cheering (to reduce anxiety), the book offers a crumb of comfort:

In reality, only a minority of students take part in the more egregious sorts of disorder that “The Coddling” documents. In the spectrum of threats to Western democracy, cock-eyed campus politics may not entirely deserve the attention it attracts.

Maybe, I can still find a little space …