Echoes through time: leave nothing for to-morrow which can be done to-day

The leading rule for a lawyer, as for the man of any other calling, is diligence.  Leave nothing for to-morrow which can be done to-day.  Never let your correspondence fall behind.  Whatever piece of business you have in hand, before stopping do all the labor pertaining to it which can then be done.

Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), Notes for a law lecture

This echo comes via the very fine Cultural Offering blog.

Brunswick Green

London. Around the corner from Brunswick Square (not far from Charles Dickens’ home on Doughty Street) and opposite an ugly development called the Brunswick Centre, I found a row of dark green doors and a childhood memory.

During a brief and unsuccessful flirtation with Airfix kits, I fell in love with the rich range of exotically named Humbrol enamels. Brunswick Green was one of my favourites, along with Prussian Blue.

Back then, it never occurred to me to ask where (or what) Brunswick was. Good old Wikipedia.

Brunswick green is a common name for green pigments made from copper compounds, although the name has also been used for other formulations that produce a similar hue, such as mixtures of chrome yellow and Prussian blue. The pigment is named after Braunschweig, Germany (also known as Brunswick in English) where it was first manufactured. It is a deep, dark green, which may vary from intense to very dark, almost black.[42]

The first recorded use of Brunswick green as a color name in English was in 1764.[43] Another name for this color is English green. The first use of English green as a synonym for Brunswick green was in 1923.[44]

Deep Brunswick green is commonly recognized as part of the British racing green spectrum, the national auto racing color of the United Kingdom.

Brunswick green
About these coordinates    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #1B4D3E
sRGBB  (rgb) (27, 77, 62)
CMYKH   (cmyk) (65, 0, 20, 70)
HSV       (hsv) (162°, 65%, 30%)
Source [Unsourced]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The truth about trickle down – Thomas Sowell

A valuable explanation of how capitalism works from Thomas Sowell. It has nothing to do with wishful thinking or “trickle-down” thinking:

Those who imagine that profits first benefit business owners — and that benefits only belatedly trickle down to workers — have the sequence completely backward. When an investment is made, whether to build a railroad or to open a new restaurant, the first money is spent hiring people to do the work. Without that, nothing happens.

Money goes out first to pay expenses first and then comes back as profits later — if at all. The high rate of failure of new businesses makes painfully clear that there is nothing inevitable about the money coming back.

I came across this on someone’s blog. A hat-tip is due, but I can’t remember where I saw it.  Sorry.

Read the full piece, here.

 

Image: CapitalismMagazine.com

Echoes through time: most of what we say and do…

‘If thou wouldst know contentment, let thy deeds by few,’ said the sage. … Most of what we say and do is not necessary, and its omission would save both time and trouble. At every step, therefore, a man should ask himself, ‘Is this one of the things that are superfluous?’ Moreover, not idle actions only but even idle impressions ought to be suppressed; for then unnecessary action will not ensue.

Marcus Aurelius (AD 120 – 180), Meditations (4.24)

 

Echoes through time: the roads of nature

I travel the roads of nature until the hour when I shall lie down and be at rest; yielding back my last breath into the air from which I have drawn it daily, and sinking down upon the earth from which my father derived the seed, my mother the blood, and my nurse the milk of my being – the earth which for so many years has furnished my daily meat and drink, and, though so grievously abused, still suffers me to tread its surface.

Marcus Aurelius (AD 120 – 180), Meditations (5.4)

 

The Medieval gig economy? @HistoryToday

History Today has a piece by David Long on the employment status of the average priest in Medieval times.

As various professions like Law were emerging, the Church was well established as a career of choice, easily overlapping power in the secular and spiritual worlds. A young priest from a well-heeled family could afford a good education and a professional role as a prince (or at least senior manager) of the church.

The average priest-in-the-street, however, had more of a portfolio career, picking up priesting gigs in the neighbourhood and mixing those with other consulting and “enforcing” jobs.

Long parallels this “hollowing out” of the front-line parish profession with today’s “ever more casual and commercialised” professions.

I think it’s simply another reminder that our perception of work as a solid, predictable, 9 to 5, 18 to 65, activity is a relatively modern (and fleeting) construct of the Industrial Revolution. Work wasn’t like that before, and it won’t be like that after.

 

Photo by Nick Karvounis on Unsplash