Stoicism 101 – Massimo Pigliucci

If you missed Stoic Week, but have an interest in stoicism, this is a good introduction. Massimo Pigliucci, K.D. Irani Professor of Philosophy at  City University of New York, is a contributor to Modern Stoicism, the organisation behind Stoic Week.

Just under an hour long and well worth a watch:

Write it down – Nicholas Bate

Another jagged thought (number 324) from Nicholas Bate. It reminds me of the stoic practice of journaling.

It’s tempting not to write the problem down for fear of making it real.

But the process of writing it down starts the process of reducing the problem, taming its power and identifying a solution.

Sometimes saying it, writing it, places boundaries on an otherwise infinite worry.

Read Nicholas, here.

 

Photo by Asdrubal luna on Unsplash

 

Rules for sons – Cultural Offering

This via Kurt at Cultural Offering:

Rules For Sons:

1. Never shake a man’s hand sitting down.

2. Don’t enter a pool by the stairs.

3. The man at the Braai is the closest thing to a king.

4. In a negotiation, never make the first offer.

5. Request the late check-out.

6. When entrusted with a secret, keep it.

7. Hold your heroes to a higher standard.

8. Return a borrowed car with a full tank of gas.

9. Play with passion or not at all…

10. When shaking hands, grip firmly and look him in the eye.

11. Don’t let a wishbone grow where a backbone should be.

12. If you need music on the beach, you’re missing the point.

Read the rest, here.

 

Image: Photo by Xavier Mouton Photographie on Unsplash

Something for the weekend – Jordan Peterson

These are really good: two (different) lectures by Jordan Peterson in Iceland. As I recall, the second lecture starts with some background on how he came to write 12 Rules for Life.

The book made its way to the top of the Must-Read pile and I’m currently half-way through. Exceptionally lucid.

And, as Stoic Week nears its end, I see a lot of commonality between Peterson’s responsibility-over-rights perspective and the Stoic perspective.

Set aside a few (well, five) hours to feed the mind…

 

The appearance of business. Don’t be fooled – @execupundit

The Execupundit has sage words from Samuel Johnson:

There is no kind of idleness by which we are so easily seduced as that which dignifies itself by the appearance of business.

I suspect this is not a problem for the prolific Mr Wade. Read him regularly, here.

 

Photo by Holger Link on Unsplash

Just start – Nicholas Bate

The always inspiring Nicholas Bate reminds us of the secret to success – just start:

  1. Startwhatever your mood, whatever the weather.
  2. Start small.
  3. Start with a bang.
  4. Start to prove them wrong.

Start by reading Nicholas each morning, here.

 

Photo by Caleb Woods on Unsplash

Annual Stoic Week – Royal Holloway, University of London

Sign up now for the eighth, annual Stoic Week.

It’s being run by the (incidentally, very beautiful) Royal Holloway college, University of London and consists of a free, online course starting from 1st October:

The idea behind the week is to give people an opportunity to see whether Stoic philosophy can help them lead a better life.

In order to achieve this, a free online course with step by step exercises and audio meditations has been created and anyone wishing to take part can sign up here.

Participants will be provided with wellbeing questionnaires before and after the seven days, so they can measure their progress.

and…

John Sellars, a founding member of Stoicism Today project, and Lecturer in Philosophy at Royal Holloway, said: “The Roman Stoics argue that much of our unhappiness is of our own making and the product of how we look at things, rather than the things themselves.

“In particular, they suggest we need to understand what we can and cannot control, and become accepting of those things that just cannot be changed.

The project which people can be part of in October will help them start to learn how to have Stoicism in their everyday lives and to start feeling happier about situations which may have historically held them back.”

You can sign up, here.